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BACKGROUND: It is apparent that many fertility patients consider multiple birth an ideal treatment outcome. We wished to evaluate the desire for multiple birth among patients, and the effect of patient demographics and recognition of the increased fetal risks of multiple pregnancy on this desire. METHODS: This was a prospective questionnaire study completed by 801 male and female infertility patients attending a tertiary level Canadian university fertility clinic. Two logistic regression analyses were performed with desire for multiple birth with next fertility treatment and recognition of the increased fetal risks of multiple pregnancy as the dependent variables. RESULTS: 41% of patients desired a multiple birth. Increasing duration of infertility or previous assisted reproductive treatment increased, and having previous children or recognition of the increased fetal risks decreased, this desire. Patient age or sex did not affect desire for multiple birth. Previous assisted reproductive treatment was associated with increased recognition of the fetal risks of multiple pregnancy. CONCLUSIONS: A significant proportion of fertility patients considers multiple birth an ideal treatment outcome. Recognition of the increased fetal risks of multiple pregnancy significantly reduced this desire. Patient education may play an important role in assisting physicians in the quest to reduce the contribution of assisted reproductive treatment to multiple births and their attending complications.

Original publication

DOI

10.1093/humrep/deh097

Type

Journal article

Journal

Hum Reprod

Publication Date

03/2004

Volume

19

Pages

558 - 561

Keywords

Adult, Female, Fetal Diseases, Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice, Humans, Infertility, Female, Infertility, Male, Logistic Models, Male, Pregnancy, Pregnancy, Multiple, Prospective Studies, Risk Factors, Surveys and Questionnaires