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Severe lower respiratory tract infection (LRTI) in infants caused by respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) has been associated with later pneumonia hospitalization among children. To determine risk for pneumonia after RSV hospitalization in infancy, we conducted a retrospective cohort analysis of 2,813 infants admitted to a hospital in Kenya and identified readmissions for pneumonia among this group during early childhood (<60 months of age). Incidence of readmission for pneumonia was higher for children whose first admission as infants was for LRTI and who were <3 months of age than for children who were first admitted as infants for non-LRTI, irrespective of RSV status. Incidence of readmission for pneumonia with wheeze was higher for children whose first admission involved RSV compared with those who had non-RSV LRTI. Excess pneumonia risk persisted for 2 years after the initial hospitalization. Close postdischarge follow-up of infants with LRTI, with or without RSV, could help prevent severe pneumonia later in childhood.

Original publication

DOI

10.3201/eid1902.120940

Type

Journal article

Journal

Emerg Infect Dis

Publication Date

02/2013

Volume

19

Pages

223 - 229

Keywords

Cohort Studies, Female, Humans, Incidence, Infant, Infant, Newborn, Kenya, Length of Stay, Male, Patient Readmission, Pneumonia, Viral, Respiratory Syncytial Virus Infections, Respiratory Syncytial Viruses, Retrospective Studies, Risk Factors