Cookies on this website
We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. If you click 'Continue' we'll assume that you are happy to receive all cookies and you won't see this message again. Click 'Find out more' for information on how to change your cookie settings.

OBJECTIVE: To assess recruitment of children to national clinical trials for acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL) and acute myeloid leukaemia (AML) in Great Britain during 1980-2007 and describe variation by some factors that might influence trial entry. DESIGN AND SETTING: Records of leukaemia patients aged 0-14 years at diagnosis were identified in the National Registry of Childhood Tumours and linked to birth registrations, Children's Cancer and Leukaemia Group records, Hospital Episode Statistics and Medical Research Council clinical trial registers. Trial entry rates were compared between categories of birth weight, congenital malformation, socioeconomic status and ethnicity. RESULTS: 9147 ALL and 1466 AML patients were eligible for national clinical trials during 1980-2007. Overall recruitment rates were 81% and 60% respectively. For ALL, rates varied significantly with congenital malformation (Down syndrome 61%, other malformations 80%, none 82%; p<0.001) and ethnicity (South Asian 78%, other minority groups 80%, white 85%; p<0.001). For AML, rates varied with birth weight (< 2500 g 48%, 2500-4000 g 69%, >4000 g 67%; p=0.001) and congenital malformation (Down syndrome 28%, other malformations 56%, none 63%; p<0.001). CONCLUSIONS: Although recruitment rates to clinical trials for childhood leukaemia are high, future trials should monitor possible variation by birth weight, ethnicity and presence of congenital malformations.

Original publication

DOI

10.1136/archdischild-2012-303268

Type

Journal article

Journal

Arch Dis Child

Publication Date

05/2014

Volume

99

Pages

407 - 412

Keywords

Congenital Abnorm, Epidemiology, Haematology, Paediatric, Adolescent, Birth Weight, Child, Child, Preschool, Clinical Trials as Topic, Congenital Abnormalities, Ethnic Groups, Great Britain, Humans, Infant, Infant, Newborn, Leukemia, Myeloid, Acute, Patient Selection, Precursor Cell Lymphoblastic Leukemia-Lymphoma, Registries, Social Class