Cookies on this website
We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. If you click 'Continue' we'll assume that you are happy to receive all cookies and you won't see this message again. Click 'Find out more' for information on how to change your cookie settings.

BACKGROUND: The behavioral pathways through which television (TV) viewing leads to increased adiposity in adults are unclear. OBJECTIVE: We wanted to determine whether the association between TV viewing and abdominal obesity in young adults is mediated by food and beverage consumption during TV viewing time or by a reduction in overall leisure-time physical activity (LTPA). DESIGN: This study involved a cross-sectional analysis of data from 2001 Australian adults aged 26-36 y. Waist circumference (WC) was measured at study clinics, and TV viewing time, frequency of food and beverage consumption during TV viewing, LTPA, and demographic characteristics were self-reported. RESULTS: Women watching TV > 3 h/d had a higher prevalence of severe abdominal obesity (WC: > or = 88 cm) compared with women watching < or = 1 h/d [prevalence ratio (PR): 1.89; 95% CI: 1.32, 2.71]. Moderate abdominal obesity (WC: 94-101.9 cm) was more prevalent in men watching TV > 3 h/d than in men watching < or = 1 h/d (PR: 2.16; 95% CI: 1.37, 3.41). Adjustment for LTPA made little difference, but adjustment for food and beverage consumption during TV viewing attenuated the associations (PR: 1.48; 95% CI: 1.01, 2.17 for women; PR: 1.73; 95% CI: 1.06, 2.83 for men). CONCLUSIONS: The association between TV viewing and WC in young adults may be partially explained by food and beverage consumption during TV viewing but was not explained by a reduction in overall LTPA. Other behaviors likely contribute to the association between TV viewing and obesity.

Type

Journal article

Journal

Am J Clin Nutr

Publication Date

05/2008

Volume

87

Pages

1148 - 1155

Keywords

Abdominal Fat, Adult, Cross-Sectional Studies, Drinking, Eating, Female, Humans, Leisure Activities, Male, Obesity, Odds Ratio, Prevalence, Television, Time Factors, Waist-Hip Ratio