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This cohort consortium is pooling data from cohorts that collected data on CVD lifestyle and biological measures related to risk of CVD during childhood.

The International Child Cardiovascular (i3C) Consortium

This cohort consortium is pooling data from cohorts that collected data on CVD lifestyle and biological measures related to risk of CVD during childhood.  These children from seven cohorts in three countries are now between 40 – 60 years of age and we have recently received an NIH grant to follow them for adult cardiovascular disease. This project aims to add a cancer component to that follow up.    The principal goal in this consortium is to attempt to separate the effects of childhood exposures from those of early adulthood on risk of both CVD and Cancer. This has not been attempted previously and the participating studies are the only ones available that have both child exposure and early adult exposure measures and are both large enough and have been continuing long enough to provide a sufficient number of subjects to afford adequate power to examine the key questions.    The opportunity for a DPhil student is to contribute to the pooling of data and to analyse the data in relation to hypotheses not already being addressed by one of the working groups.  

Training Opportunities

The engagement will be with global cohorts and teams in more than three countries and possibly new cohorts with younger subjects which might collaborate to answer questions concerning early life risk trajectories.  Epidemiological methods experience will be gained in the conduct of large cohort studies, and in the pooling and analysis of such data. In addition, there will be the possibility to participate in the analysis of data from various ‘omics analyses’ including genomics, epigenomics, and metabolomics in conjunction with the environmental exposure data. Visits to key cohorts in several countries will be required, but not on a frequent basis. This project will suit a candidate with some quantitative aptitude, an interest in biological mechanisms, and an ability to work well with a large global team.

Supervisor

Professor Terry Dwyer

Second Supervisor

Sanne Peters